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on whether she has left america's foreign policy in stronger or weaker position. most think the future lies with china than the u.s. it's not all mrs. clinton's fault. but the fact is we just don't have the influence we used to have around the world from syria to mali, we have led from behind, so in effect the former secretary of state has helped manage our decline in what looks increasingly like a post american world. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. another view on this, joining us now from new york, fox news contributor julie ragenski and former advisor to frank lautenberg and president rosenberg a center left think tank and campaign advisor to president clinton. all right, simon, tell me, where did i go wrong there on judging mrs. clinton? highly intelligent, global celebrity. >> yep. >> incredible run from first lady to senator to secretary. why was this a great tenure as secretary of state? >> first of all agrow agree with the negative characterization. i think we are safer today in the world than when barack obama took office. i think there have within two central legaci
't extreme and chuck schumer would not endorse somebody, his views on foreign policy are middle of the road. he wouldn't endorse somebody who was extreme. i think his vietnam experience is important. it's been noted and it's important that you now have at state john kerry and you would have at defense chuck hagel, two veterans of vietnam who look back and say we are ib clind to be very cautious before we commit american lives to any kind of foreign intervention. we want to be able to tell the troops. and hagel has characterized himself as an old sergeant, wants to tell the truth, so we need to make this fight. i think the good thing this hearing if it went there instead of just kind of particular attacks or questions to hagel, if this hearing went to a larger discussion of president obama's foreign policy because in broad terms hagel is with obama. obama's view is this is a moment when we need to pull back a bit, rebuild at home, and rethink some of these commitments. the americans are tired of war at this moment, and i think hagel really represents that exhaustion with the war and the desi
of the first administration's foreign policy and hillary clinton's tenure at state and i think the defining external event to the administration of foreign policy has been the arab spring, obviously, and all that uncorked and how to manage that. but before we get to that, we still have robin on satellite. i want to talk about the relationship between the president and hillary clinton and the degree to which the legacy of foreign policy in the first term has been hillary clinton's legacy and the degree to which it really has been -- the shots have been called from the white house because a lot of reporting on this has been very interesting. tonight there's going to be an interview on "60 minutes" that's a joint interview between the president and hillary clinton, a joint exit interview, and this is what the president had to say about hillary clinton's legacy. >> hillary will go down as one of the finest secretary of states we've had. it has been a great collaboration over the last four years. i'm going to miss her. i wish she was sticking around. but she has logged in so many miles i can't b
in american foreign policy in the late 1940s. if -- >> like when -- >> if there are two people that would get it. if this is a real deal, what you say, with talk radio -- >> i think it is. >> moving on this issue, and i think the bill -- >> let's also keep in mind that the democrats are trying to turn texas blue. there is work afoot to capitalize on the demographic question here. >> jody, this is my question. i feel like we're -- this is a big moment for the republican party in terms of brand and also policy. i haut this was an incredible moment when jim demint is asked about the comments that colin powell made about a dark vein of intolerance, the racism within the republican party, and also republican comments on legitimate rape and this is how jim demint, who is now president or incoming president of the heritage foundation, presumably a leading voice among conservatives, this is his answer. >> do you regret some of the comments about abortion, about rape. again, what colin powell were vailed racist comments from the party. >> david, the fact that we are losing over 3,000 unborn children a
campaign issue. but it wasn't. mitt romney wouldn't even concentrate on it during the foreign policy debate. the truth is the assassination of the ambassador and three other americans by terrorists in libya has not engaged in the american people. president hillary clinton know that they also know that the national media adores them. and that's a fact. that's the memo. now for the top story tonight, there is no question 60 mince interviews would a big win for president obama and secretary clinton. they got great pr out of it. joining us from washington is senior political analyst brit hume. yesterday i you told chris wallace that you think hillary clinton should not be described as that great secretary of state. why? >> well, first of all, it's no, not easy to be a great secretary of state. foreign policy is a province really of the president. the secretary of state is the person who is his emissary and he is expected to direct the diplomats to carry it out. so that's point one. point 2 is, that she has worked very hard. she has traveled all over the place. set some record, some 112 countrie
. afghanistan, there's no guarantee of the future. these are -- the foreign policy record, especially as it relates to terrorism, is not much of a record. >> and caryn, you've been covering the foreign policy as well as the domestic policy. this "60 minutes" interview, the joint interview, was pretty extraordinary on the face of it, but as we enter this last week of hillary clinton's tenure, the president is basically saying, you know, thank you, thank you, thank you for everything you've done. >> yeah. and she has been i think in many ways -- there are not a lot of sort of big monumental tangible accomplishments of her tenure as secretary of state. in many ways she was successful as much because of what she represented, but the history of second terms is that foreign policy becomes much more important, that presidents travel more, that they often engage more with the rest of the world, and i think that given the set of events we're looking at overseas, that is very likely to be the case of president obama's second term. foreign policy almost wasn't even almost mentioned in this elect
it to marriages or affairs, but the fact that they'd been side by side on a lot of foreign policy stuff 10 and 20 years ago and then had a break over the war in iraq and then chuck hagel didn't support john mccain when he was running for president. gwen: he did the first time but not the second time. >> right, when he was actually a candidate. gwen: the actual nominee. >> and then finally the fact that john mccain believes very deeply in his own positions and wanted to prove himself right and hagel wrong and thought he had him on the surge. all of that. >> so it was great theater. as gwen said, hagel got beaten up. is he going to get confirmed? >> yes. and it is bizarre in a that she knows probably the worst confirmation hearing performance that any of us can remember of any nominee -- certainly for a cabinet position. supreme court nominations are a little different. and it all comes down to there are 55 democrats. none of those democrats have said they will vote against him. ok. one republican, thad cochran of mississippi has said he will vote for hagel. that makes him the unluckiest republican
on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitting together if you thought about where we were five years ago and them saying shame on you and you're likeable enough. >> you're a racist. >> andrea mitchell, am i being too cynical this morning? because these are two people i respect a great deal. >> a great deal. >> well, it was sort of -- as you're pointing out, it was really unusual to see them together. and to see the relationship that they have developed, i think that they have developed a close relationship. i was really intrigued by when he -- when steve kroft asked about what about the staffs, and they acknowledged it took longer for their staffs to get over the hurt and anger after the campaign, and i would say still hasn't happened, exactly. because she has been the most celebrated secretary of state and certainly the most high-profile member of the cabinet. and gets along very
on this complex issue. robert kagn is a center fellow of the united states and european foreign policy of the brookings institution. his most recent book "the world america made" has been published and dr. kagan also serves as a member of secretary clinton's foreign policy board soon to be senator kerry's policy board and writes a monthly column on a world affairs from "the washington post" and the weekly standard and the new republic. joshua landis is the director of the center for middle east studies and this is the professor at the university of oklahoma. he writes a daily newsletter on syrian policy that attract some 200,000 pages a month. is really one of the most thoughtful blogs today on a which really dives into the crisis and syria. current the vice president for the new initiatives and the distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson institute at national center for scholars in washington, d.c. they can have another great president. for nearly to nearly two decades has served the secretaries of state and advisers in the middle east bureau, negotiating middle east peace which w
of the president's meek foreign policy. it was score one for hillary and i think this was an attempt to kind of build on that and move beyond it and talk about hillary clinton's legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. during the hearing what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary on benghazi. the democrats weren't. both sides kept saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. some of the accomplishment. helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya to topple khadafi. assembled the coalition with the toughest sanctions ever on iran and established diplomatic ties with burma. >> i think the examples would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to a case for greatness. the groundwork on burma had been ton by the previous administration and the administration properly followed through on it. are arabs and israelis closer to peace? how about iran and north korea and the nuclear programs? halted or seriously set back? has the reset with russia which she so famously introduced with the photo
by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam if it is carried out, i will resist it." you continued on and on talking about what a disaster the search would be, even to the point where it was clear the search was succeeding. in march 2008, you said, "the term " quagmire could apply. even as late as august 29, 2011 , in an interview with the financial times, you said, "i disagree with president obama and his decision to surge in iraq as i did with president bush on the surge in iraq ." do you stand by those comments, senator hagel? >> i stand by them because i made them. >> were you correct in your assessment? >> i would defer to the judgment of history. >> were you write are wrong about the search? >> i will explain why i've made those comments. >> i want to know whether you are right or wrong. i expect a direct answer. >> it we reviewed the record -- >> please answer the question -- were you correct or incorrect when you said that the search would be most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? correct o
secretary of state. why? >> well, first it's not easy to be a great secretary of state. foreign policy is a provence of the president. the secretary of state is his emmisary and directed to direct diplomats to carry it out. that is point one. point two, she worked hard, traveled all over the place but the list after chiefment that's can be attributed to her is not long and it's not major. i mean, how well has it reset with russia worked down that she was involved in start something how are things before arabs and israelies? how about iran, north korea. have they been halted? no. i don't think so. you look around for a clinton doctrine has she articulated a new way of think something i would say not. what about major treaties? has she engaged in negotiations that led to the signing of major treaties or any major treaty? the answer to those questions appears to be no. these are the things that might put you in the category that might put you in the category of great secretary of state. she's worked hard zrk her home work, but great? i don't think great. >> bill: you left out the arab spr
't manage to put benghazi into the broader context of the president's weak foreign policy which i'll be important to them when they deal, for instance with the hagel nomination. so it was score one for hillary and i think it was an attempt to build on that and move beyond it and talk about her legacy as a whole rather than that event. >> chris: i want to pick up on that, brit. because, during the hearing, what struck me was the republicans were tough on hillary, on benghazi and the democrats weren't. but, both sides kept on saying what a great secretary of state she had been and to praise her service. and here's some of the points that have been brought up, some of her accomplishments. she helped assemble the bombing campaign in libya, to topple muammar qaddafi. she helped assembly the coalition that imposed the toughest sanctions ever on iran. and, she established diplomatic ties with burma. question, brit: how do you rate hillary clinton's performance, record as our top diplomat. >> i think those examples you cited would add up to a case for her competence. they do not add up to
. was that a mistake? >> i don't think that was a mistake. if you look at the overarching ark of our foreign policy, democrats had a sizeable advantage over republicans on the issues of foreign policy and keeping us safe. hillary clinton played a large role in that. if you look at -- i agree with you on the arab spring. got only knows what that is going to turn into. if you look at getting rid of gadhafi, and a large role in whether or not she runs for president because americans don't pay that much attention to foreign policy. >> if she's healthy, given the blood cloth and concussion, if she's healthy, do you think there's any doubt that she's still thinking about being the first woman as president of the united states? >> i have no idea what is in her head. she's certainly a strong institution of the democratic party, certainly stronger than joe biden does. the foreign policy will loom large. we'll ask the question, so what did the obama administration's afghanistan surge accomplish exactly? they sent tens and thousands of additional troops, spent a lot of money. we are going to be out of afghani
correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> answer the question, senator hagel. the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like you to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things today. >> the records show that you refuse to answer that question. now please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no? >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. as i've already said, my answer is i'll defer that judgment to history. >> i think history has already made a judgment about the surge, sir, and you're on the wrong side of it. >> willie, that actually went on much longer. >> it was awkward. >> than that, and it was badgering. it sort of reminded me
dangerous foreign policy blunter in this country since vietnam. were you correct or incorrect? yes or no? >> my reference to the -- >> senator hagel -- >> well, if you would like me to explain, why -- >> well, i actually would like an answer. yes or no. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. >> name one person in your opinion who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate. >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> perry, republicans in what you're hearing in washington, d.c. proud of the performance they demonstrated yesterday? >> this is a very unusual hearing. usually when an ex senator comes to be nominated for something, his former colleagues treat him nicely. hillary clinton had that, john kerry had that. very striking yesterday. the republicans, they seemed very happy to, you know, pile on a really sharply attack chuck hagel. you saw roy blunt come out today and say he's not voting for this nominee. you saw the republicans be
any big imprints with foreign policy, what they tried to pursue like having everlasting peace in the middle east, you end up seeing a perspective from both hillary clinton and barack obama where they were trying to put out a lot of fires around the world in a very, very messy world. thank you very much. great pleasure having you on for two segments today. programming note, this wednesday see andrea mitchell's interview with secretary of state hillary clinton. that's at 1:00 eastern time on "andrea mitchell reports" right before our hour. >>> coming up -- >> a minority majority. >> a what? >> the minorities will be the majority. >> the minorities will be the majority. congresswoman nancy pelosi says in july hispanics will become the majority in her home state. how could the state's new minority majority impact the midterms and point the direction or the arrow to texas as well in this discussion. >>> plus, we'll get the latest on the nightclub fire in brazil that's taken the lives of more than 200 people. many of them under the age of 20 years old. we'll have details in the late
at the -- at the american foreign policy. >> does the president deserve to have the -- >> i firmly believe when you get to choose the cabinet that you want and there, of course, is the advice and consent of the senate, and that's an important part of the process. i think that's why these hearings are going to be quite illuminating. i think you will see some changes from senator hagel based on some of the past statements that he has made. he has had some policy prescriptions that haven't worked out right, and i think many of these senators are going to explore those, and as part of trying to find the right foreign policy platform for the country, that's all going to be part of that debate. >> kevin madden, it's great to see you again. thank you very much. >>> how are the nation's civil rights leaders now reacting to the bipartisan effort to overhaul immigration? the national urban league's mark joining us next. [ male announcer ] eligible for medicare? that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare
, the unrest taking place in egypt right now. clinton stood by one of the most consciousal foreign policy decisions the administration made that gets little little -- the ouster of mubarak. she responded to the head of the army who said that the state could fall part. >> that would lead to incredible chaos and violence on a scale that would be devastating for egypt and the region. >> clinton also commented on the russia reset. once perceived as a foreign policy success now has erode the to the point the russians won't even let american families adopt russian children. >> i think we just have to wait and see what the real objectives of the new russian leadership are. we thought it was self-defeating for them to take the actions they did, throwing out usaid. that hurts the russian people. i thought it was tragic that they stopped adoptions, especially those that were already in train. so there are issues. we will keep working on them, but we'll also draw lines where we disagree and seek out when we must. >> interesting she referred to it as they. we know when all this changed, when putin go
.s. wages war and the president's attempts to put an imprint on u.s. foreign policy. today, hagel will have his first chance to publicly respond to his critics, in a 112-page questionnaire requested by the committee, hagel begins to do that on iran and israel. this is what he said in the questionnaire, and he'll be questioned about this today. on the questionnaire, i am committed to considering all options to counter iran and its aggression and to maintain u.s. support for missile defense systems in israel. translation, he's for unilateral military action if necessary against iran. more. "if iran continues to flout its international obligations, it should continue to face severe and growing consequences. while there is time and space for diplomacy, backed by pressure, the window is closing." this is what he says on gay rights in the questionnaire, "i fully support gay and lesbian women serving openly in the u.s. military and am committed to a full implementation of the repeal of don't ask, don't tell." and on the use of force, "i believe we must think very carefully before we commit our arm
? will you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no. >> my reference to the surge being -- >> the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straight forward question. >> well -- >> i would like to answer whether you are right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i am not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things. >> let the record show you refuse to answer that question. now, please go ahead. >> well, if you would like me to explain why i -- >> i absolutely would like answer answer. yes or no. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that. >> is this finally the year for immigration reform? president obama sits down with jose diaz bullart. >> i don't think that it should take many, many months. i think this is something that we should be able to get done certainly this year, and i would like to see if we can get it done sooner. >> in newtown parents of the young victims
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 104 (some duplicates have been removed)